Ways to make your child feel loved and valued

ways to make your child feel loved and valued

Few ways to make your child feel loved and valued

Parents who want their children to develop high self-esteem make a point of treating them with respect and courtesy. They don’t reserve “please,” Thank you,” and “I’m sorry” for adults. They don’t belittling their children, and they correct or punish them when they can, to help their kids save face. And they advice, “Don’t take it all too seriously. No single incident will shape your child’s character!”

Increasing children often have a profound influence on television and movies, this age is such. They will have to realise that apart from the opposite sex, also parents, brother and sister. They have to explain with love it’s extending in the growing age is only physical attraction, not enduring affection.

This is where the real intuition and reconciliation between the two begin. If you can not explain your point to the child properly and you are sticking to the rules, then there can be trouble. At this age children want to live by their own will and they can not tolerate parental control.

By Deed of conveyance

  • Keep a running list on the refrigerator door of positive things your child has done that day. Read the list at bedtime to help your child feel good about herself before going to sleep.
  • Share baby record books and photo albums with your older children, so they enjoy their growth and development.
  • Let your kids entertain you with plays they make up. Give them wooden or mixing beaters to use as microphones,”and prepare to clap a lot as they ham it up!
  • Create an impression! Cut around your child’s hand in cookie dough to make handprint cookies, or make a large picture by tracing an outline of your child’s body on paper or cardboard and then cutting it out.
  • Keep a “baby” drawer or box for archiving anecdotes and keepsakes from your child’s life. Add to it as often as you like, including the letter you wrote to your unborn child while you were pregnant. The drawer or box may also serve as a place to store your child’s as she grows older. Going through the box once or twice a year will be fun for all!
  • Keep a joint diary with your child. Have her contribute to the content and provide illustrations wherever she likes. Cover the pages with clear contact paper to preserve them. Occasionally read a page or two to your child at bedtime.
  • Tape-record your child’s voice while she’s singing, reciting, or taking with you. Play t back for your child, expressing your delight at her verbal skills.

Making children feel special by word

  • Use your child’s name often in conversation, and use nick names only if your child like’s them. Use your child’s name in other ways, too (wooden letters on the wall of your child’s room, magnetic letters on the refrigerator, a sign on door, a puzzle, a homemade place mat and so on.
  • Designate a special song for each member of the family. Making up your own words can make it even more special.
  • Share a special secret with each child it could be a middle child secret (if both parent and child qualify) or a code word that no one else knows.
  • Tell your child to give himself a pat on the back for something done well.(Children need to learn to affirm themselves, since parents won’t always be there to do it.)

Specials for fathers

In spite of the facts that dada is one of the first words a baby learns (often inspired by mom, who wants to make dad feel good), fathers often spend comparatively less time with their children when they’re small. Today more and more fathers are finding that they want to have a meaningful influence on their children’s lives, and many have developed specials things to do.

  • Take advantage of your natural inclination to get down on the floor play can be special father-child time.
  • Share your morning shave time with your child. Make a shaving cream beard on your child’s face, and have your child (girl or boy) shave it off with a plastic spoon or an old credit card that’s been cut into the shape of a razor.
  • Write down your feelings periodically about being a parent and about how you see your children. You’ll like looking back on your writings, and so will your children when they’re old enough.
  • Visit your parents with one child at a time, leaving your partner and other children at home. It’s excellent one-on-one time, plus your parents may seldom get to see you without your partner.
  • Give your time, rather than “things”. Write down a list of activities you and your child enjoy together, and let your child choose one when a reward is in order.
  • Bring a memento home from a business trip, but be aware that it need not to be an expensive present. The small soaps, shower caps, and shoe-cleaning cloths from hotels are always appreciated, as are airline magazines, plastic utensils from meals, and packets of sugar or condiments.
  • Write notes or letters to your children if you must depart before they wake up.

Making play dates work

Play dates can occur with or without a second parent around. A child’s separation anxiety quotient will be your determine factor.

  • Help your child select a playmate with similar interests (dinosaurs, babies, and so on) so they’ll be more likely to have fun.
  • Planning one play date a week is usually sufficient.
  • Take your child’s nap schedule into account. You may have to limit play dates to children who are on a similar nap schedule.
  • Take preventive measures to minimize conflict by asking your child to put away hard-to-share toys. Take out duplicate toys, and ask your child to your child about sharing before playmates comes over.
  • Start with a snack if children are coming from preschool or another group setting.
  • Start playtime with one planned activity, and let them go from there.
  • Have the children meet at a neutral setting, such as a park or a playground, if you don’t have the time or inclination to clean up at home.
  • Try to keep your child’s siblings out of the play date activities, if possible.
  • Limit play dates to an hour or two. (Start with half hour and build up.)
  • Plan on takin your child’s playmate at home, if you can. Creating a good and timely end to play date can influence its success.

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